Euphyllia Corals

This species, known to hobbyists as the hammer coral, is found in the waters of the northern Indian Ocean, the central Indo-Pacific, Australia, Southeast Asia, southern Japan and East China Sea, and east as far as Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands (Turak et. al. 2008a). It has especially long tentacles when extended, like many other large-polyp stony corals, but they’re tipped with sausage, anchor, or hammerhead-like knobs, which is where its common name comes from. It typically comes in various shades of brown and fluorescent green with the tentacle tips often being lighter or different colored, but occasional specimens may be pinkish, orangish, or bluish. It also has a curving, wall-like (flabello-meandroid) skeleton. Note that this species is also called the anchor coral at times, but I’ll address this second name below.
Euphyllia paraancora
This species, known to hobbyists as the branching hammer coral, is found In the waters of the central Indo-Pacific, west Pacific and central Indian Ocean (Turak et. al. 2008b). It also has especially long tentacles that are with tipped anchor or hammerhead-like knobs, and also typically comes in various shades of brown and fluorescent green, with the tentacle tips often being lighter or different colored. Specimens bearing tentacles of other colors can be found at times, too. However, this species has a branching (phaceloid) skeleton rather than a flabello-meandroid skeleton.

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